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The Times

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/formula_1/article6880955.ece
The 50 greatest Formula One drivers: updated after Button's title triumph
How do you measure greatness? A year ago Jenson Button scraped into our list of the 50 greatest Formula One drivers. Even though he was rated at just 41, the decision inspired fury among many readers who believed that a man with a decade in the sport and a single victory to his name had no place in our motor racing pantheon.
We noted then that Button had everything he needed to be a world champion – except the car. Note how his peers in that list – from Fangio to Moss and Stewart to Hakkinen – were all blessed with the best machinery of the time so that they could fully display their talents, while Button has for much of his career been forced to accept the limitations of his cars.
How different it all looks now since Ross Brawn finally gave Button the machinery. Button has at last fulfilled his promise, winning what could be the first of several world championships, which is why we have updated our top 50 to take account of a new name that deserves to be given even greater prominence.
There are 14 British drivers represented, the most from any single nation, and that includes a remarkable 10 world champions, now that Button has completed the set in exhilarating fashion at the Brazilian Grand Prix. Amazing how fortunes change…and how promise can finally be fulfilled. Welcome Jenson Button to his new ranking on our list.



50. Michele Alboreto

23.12.1956 to 25.4.2001
Italy
Grands prix: 194
Wins: 5
World Championships: none

"Nice guy" racer who stayed too long. Feted by none other than Enzo Ferrari when he hired his fellow Italian for the Scuderia, and won five races. But once he left - a victim of Ferrari politics - it was a long slide down to Minardi, where his F1 career ended. Killed in Germany testing an Audi sports car for the Le Mans 24-hour Race.
49. Peter Collins
8.11.1931 to 3.8.1958
Great Britain
Grands prix: 32
Wins: 3
World Championships: none
Finished third in his first full season in F1, driving for Ferrari. But impressed the sport when he voluntarily handed over his car to Juan Manuel Fangio to finish the Italian Grand Prix. It ended his hopes of a World Championship that was never to be. Collins was killed at the German Grand Prix after only 32 grands prix.
48. Clay Regazzoni
5.9.1939 to 11.12.2006
Switzerland
Grands prix: 132
Wins: 5
World Championships: none
Maverick who spent much of his career at Ferrari but will be remembered for scoring the first grand-prix victory for the Williams team at the British GP in 1979. The fun-loving Regazzoni’s F1 career ended when he crashed at the 1980 United States GP, although he went on to race in cars with adapted controls. Killed in a road crash in Italy.
47. Dan Gurney
13.4.1931
United States
Grands prix: 86
Wins: 4
World Championships: none
Americans are thin on the ground in Formula One but Gurney was highly rated by his European counterparts as an immensely quick driver. This son of an opera singer never managed to lay hands on a car that could do full justice to his talents in an era dominated by Jim Clark and Graham Hill.
46. Gerhard Berger
27.8.1959
Austria
Grands prix: 210
Wins: 10
World Championships: none
The practical joker whose winning smile belied a tough racing character, good enough to sit alongside Ayrton Senna at McLaren and win the Brazilian’s respect and affection. But two spells at Ferrari when the Scuderia struggled were unproductive and Berger may feel his talent was never fully realised.
45. Lorenzo Bandini
21.12.1936 to 10.5.1967
Italy
Grands prix: 42
Wins: 1
World Championships: none
Exotic and fast, Bandini lived in the shadow of John Surtees, his team leader at Ferrari. Died in a gruesome, fiery crash at Monaco in full view of the world’s television cameras at the age of just 32. Still remembered at a colourful annual ceremony in Brisighella, his home town.
44. Jo Siffert
7.7.1936 to 24.10.1971
Switzerland
Grands prix: 96
Wins: 2
World Championships: none
A scion of the great independent team run by Rob Walker, and a sports car racer of repute, Siffert showed pace that put him alongside his great rivals of the time. Unfortunately, after a solid career, Siffert was killed in a non-championship, end-of-season F1 race at Brands Hatch.

43. Giuseppe Farina
30.10.1906 to 30.6.1966
Italy
Grands prix: 33
Wins: 5
World Championships: 1
Winner of the inaugural World Championship of the modern era in 1950. Aloof but exotic, in his Alfa Romeo and then Ferrari, Farina was the epitome of the dashing racing driver of the early years, although his single title win was the high point of his career. Killed in a road crash on the way to watch the French Grand Prix.
42. Phil Hill
20.4.1927
United States
Grands prix: 48
Wins: 3
World Championships: 1 (1961)
The quiet man of F1 won his championship with Ferrari when Enzo, the founder, was at his Machiavellian worst. Clinched the title in the Italian Grand Prix at which Wolfgang von Trips, his team-mate, careered into the crowd, killing himself and 14 spectators. After leaving Ferrari, his career went into slow decline.
41. Tony Brooks
25.2.1932
Great Britain
Grands prix: 38
Wins: 6
World Championships: none
The qualified dentist from Cheshire is spoken of with genuine affection by all who came into contact with him. Regarded as one of the finest drivers of his generation, but too polite and mild-mannered to unleash a killer instinct during one of the most competitive eras in Formula One racing.

40. Carlos Reutemann

12.4.1942
Argentina
Grands prix: 146
Wins: 12
World Championships: none

Somewhat enigmatic man from Santa Fe, now a politician, promised much for Brabham and Ferrari before moving to Williams, where he came within a hair’s breadth of becoming champion, only losing out at the final race of the 1981 season to Nelson Piquet. Inexplicably walked away from the sport two races into the 1982 season.
39. Jackie Ickx
1.1.1945
Belgium
Grands prix: 116
Wins: 8
World Championships: none
Enjoyed brilliant spells with Ferrari and Brabham but never came close to achieving the championship that many had marked him down for. Considered so fast that Sir Jackie Stewart once suggested the Belgian slow down for his own self-preservation. Finished his career in uncompetitive Ensign and Ligier cars.
37. Rubens Barrichello
23.5.1972
Brazil
Grands prix: 287
Wins: 11
World Championships: none

Refuses to give up and has secured a seat at Brawn Racing for 2009 to extend an already long career. Likeable Brazilian who could match Michael Schumacher, his Ferrari team-mate, for pace on his day but was too psychologically vulnerable ever to master the German. However, he could win in grand style, as he did memorably at Silverstone in 2003.
37. Jody Scheckter
29.1.1950
South Africa
Grands prix: 112
Wins: 10
World Championships: 1 (1979)

Hugely talented if somewhat accident-prone - with 16 crashes recorded in seven seasons - Scheckter achieved his championship at Ferrari while partnered with the mercurial Gilles Villeneuve. A later career in the arms industry has been followed by life as an organic farmer in the South of England.
36. Felipe Massa
25.4.1981
Brazil
Grands prix: 116
Wins: 11
World Championships: none
So near yet so far, heart-breakingly defeated in 2008 by a single point by Lewis Hamilton. Massa has rarely been treated as a serious contender but has won grudging respect, not just for standing up to Hamilton but for quelling the undoubted talent of Kimi Raikkonen, his Ferrari teammate. Still time for a title.
35. Ronnie Peterson
14.2.1944 to 11.9.1978
Sweden
Grands prix: 123
Wins: 10
World Championships: none
Regarded by Max Mosley, president of the FIA and former team owner at March, as one of the fastest drivers of all time. Spectacular style that took him to second place in the 1971 championship behind Jackie Stewart, but killed in a Lotus Ford during the Italian Grand Prix at Monza.
34. Didier Pironi
26.3.1952 to 23.8.1987
France
Grands prix: 70
Wins: 3
World Championships: none
Infamous for his tremendous infighting with Gilles Villeneuve while they were team-mates at Ferrari. Fuelled by desire to become the first French champion but thwarted disastrously in a massive, career-ending accident in practice for the German Grand Prix at Hockenheim. Killed in a powerboat crash in the Solent.

33. David Coulthard

27.3.1971
Great Britain
Grands prix: 247
Wins: 13
World Championships: none
The great underachiever, unlucky enough to have pitched up in F1 at the same time as two fierce talents, Mika Hakkinen, his McLaren team-mate, and Michael Schumacher. On his day, an awesomely fast driver, but, arguably, allowed his constant self-analysis to overwhelm his undoubted gifts. Still the highest British points scorer in history.
32. Denny Hulme
18.6.1936 to 4.10.1992
New Zealand
Grands prix: 112
Wins: 8
World Championships: 1 (1967)
Regarded as a tough and irascible character but deeply affected by the death of Bruce McLaren, his countryman and friend. Rose to prominence as Jack Brabham’s team-mate but could more than hold his own during a Formula One era that was both flamboyant and highly competitive.
31. Damon Hill

17.9.1960

Great Britain

Grands prix: 115

Wins: 22

World Championships: 1 (1996)


Intelligent, articulate and, perhaps, too sensitive for the cut-throat world of F1. Admits he was fazed by the aggressive Michael Schumacher but held everything together to claim a World Championship that delighted a nation. Moved on to Jordan, but retirement was a messy and unpleasant affair that marred his career.



30. Juan Pablo Montoya

20.9.1975

Colombia

Grands prix: 84

Wins: 7

World Championships: none

The ego had landed when Sir Frank Williams brought Montoya from IndyCar racing in the United States. A great improviser with a brilliant flair for overtaking, Montoya struggled with the discipline of Formula One, making too many mistakes. Broke early with McLaren as disillusion set in and headed back to the US to race in NASCAR.



29. John Surtees

11.2.1934

Great Britain

Grands prix: 111

Wins: 6

World Championships: 1 (1964)

His feat of being a world champion on both two wheels and four will probably never be surpassed. Very much his own man, Surtees fell out spectacularly with Enzo Ferrari two years after winning his only title and went to Honda, where he won a grand prix for the Japanese before they pulled out of F1.



28. Bruce McClaren

30.8.1937 to 2.6.1970

New Zealand

Grands prix: 101

Wins: 4

World Championships: none


The name lives on although McLaren had no connection to the team that now bears his name under the stewardship of Ron Dennis. McLaren was a precocious talent and a former youngest championship points scorer before he was usurped, appropriately, by Lewis Hamilton for McLaren. Killed testing a McLaren CanAm car at Goodwood.


27. Mario Andretti

28.2.1940

United States

Grands prix: 128

Wins: 12

World Championships: 1 (1978)


Now head of a racing family dynasty in the US, Andretti can be acclaimed as the best American to compete in Formula One. Born in Trieste, Italy, his family moved to America as the Second World War started, but Andretti was inspired by Italy’s racers. Won the Indy 500 before triumphing with Lotus in F1.



26. Mike Hawthorn

10.4.1929 to 22.1.1959

Great Britain

Grands prix: 45

Wins: 3

World Championships: 1 (1958)


The quintessential English racer of the 1950s with his dashing looks. Probably not in the class of some of his contemporaries and won his title amid controversial circumstances, with Phil Hill, his Ferrari team-mate, ordered to pull over so that Hawthorn could beat Stirling Moss to the title. Killed in a car crash on the Guildford bypass.



25. Jacques Villeneuve

9.4.1971

Canada

Grands prix: 151

Wins: 11

World Championships: 1 (1997)

A career you could argue wrecked by bad management. A revelation as Damon Hill’s team-mate in 1996 and went on to become champion a year later. But then followed Craig Pollock, his manager, to the disaster that was the new British American Racing team where he became embittered and eventually embarrassed by the talents of Jenson Button.



24. Keke Rosberg

6.12.1948

Finland

Grands prix: 114

Wins: 5

World Championships: 1 (1982)


The moustachioed Rosberg somehow failed to live up to his rich early promise. His world title, won with Williams, was a model of consistency rather than a flamboyant procession, with only a single victory in the season. Retired perhaps too soon, turning to driver management, which includes managing Nico, his son, now driving for Williams.



23. Alan Jones

2.11.1946

Australia

Grands prix: 116

Wins: 12

World Championships: 1 (1980)


Powerful and brave, looked more like a rugby player than a Formula One driver. Splendid relationship with Sir Frank Williams brought a first world title for the British team. But they were the glory days and there was only one more good season and a third place in the championship before his career petered out at Arrows and the ill-fated Lola-Haas outfit.



22. Emerson Fittipaldi

12.12.1946

Brazil

Grands prix: 144

Wins: 14

World Championships: 2 (1972, 74)


Catapulted into the leadership of the Lotus team after the death of Jochen Rindt, Fittipaldi won only his fourth grand prix. Went on to drive with distinction for Lotus and McLaren, but took the emotional decision to join a team run by Wilson, his brother, in 1976. That spelt the demise of a great career.

How Fitterpaldi kept his eye on the title

21. Lewis Hamilton

7.1.1985

Great Britain

Grands prix: 51

Wins: 11

World Championships: 1 (2008)

Youngest world champion who exploded into F1 - but is he really that good? In the best car of the past two years yet makes too many mistakes and is competing in, arguably, a Formula One field short of star talent. No arguing, though, with his exciting style but the jury is out on whether he will attain the status of a legend although 2009 was, arguably, his best season, wrestling with a difficult car yet still getting the job done.



20. Sir Jack Brabham

2.4.1926

Australia

Grands prix: 126

Wins: 14

World Championships: 3 (1959, 60, 66)

The only man to win a World Championship in his own car, which is some achievement, especially because he was aged 40 at the time. On arrival in Britain, lucked into the all-conquering, rear-engined Cooper, which helped him sweep up two championships. Brabham was tough and practical, qualities that propelled him to a third title.

Jack Brabham makes motoring history



19. Gilles Villeneuve

18.1.1950 to 8.5.1982

Canada

Grands prix: 67

Wins: 6

World Championships: none


No one who saw him drive could forget his utterly fearless and flamboyant style. Even now, he is the darling of the cognescenti and a Formula One legend although he was never champion. But it was a career cut cruelly short when Villeneuve crashed attempting to match the lap times of Didier Pironi, his Ferrari team-mate, preparing for the Dutch Grand Prix.



18. Jochen Rindt

18.4.1942 to 5.9.1970

Austria

Grands prix: 60

Wins: 6

World Championships: 1 (1970, awarded posthumously)


Managed by Bernie Ecclestone, now F1’s supremo, Rindt was a slow starter in F1. But after joining Lotus in 1969, he blossomed and a year later was amassing points as well as five victories. Unfortunately, Rindt crashed after a mechanical failure in practice for the Italian Grand Prix at Monza and the Austrian became Formula One’s only posthumous world champion.



17. James Hunt

29.8.1947 to 15.6.1993

Great Britain

Grands prix: 92

Wins: 10

World Championships: 1 (1976)


Flamboyant, intelligent and flawed, Hunt was the ultimate playboy driver who turned into a consummate television pundit after retirement. His world title was one of the most exciting in history and underlined his understated bravery and determination. Will forever be a favourite for millions of Formula One fans.

James Hunt reaches the summit at Fuji



16. Jenson Button
19.1.1980
Great Britain
Grands prix: 171
Wins: 7
World Championships: 1
We originally billed Button’s career as “what-might-have-been”. But now Button has realized all that potential so many people doubted. He remains supremely gifted, rarely making mistakes and capable – as he proved in Brazil to take the title – of breathtaking overtaking manoeuvres. Sometimes he is too understated for his own good but he will be one of the most popular of champions among his peers in Formula One.
15. Nelson Piquet

17.8.1952

Brazil

Grands prix: 204

Wins: 23

World Championships: 3 (1981, 83, 87)


Regarded as the ultimate professional, combining intelligence with technical know-how and supreme driving ability that reached a peak at the Bernie Ecclestone-owned Brabham team. Later switched to Williams and a great rivalry with Nigel Mansell, his teammate, where he still took third title before heading off to Lotus and Benetton.

Piquet breaks through the pain barrier



14. Niki Lauda

22.2.1949

Austria

Grands prix: 171

Wins: 25

World Championships: 3 (1975, 77, 84)


Came back from horrific burns in a crash at Germany’s frightening Nürburgring circuit to win the 1977 championship and establish himself as one of Formula One’s most extraordinary personalities. Astonishingly, had to borrow £35,000 to buy himself a Formula One seat to get started, but made his fortune and founded his own airline in retirement.

The man with unbeatable drive



13. Kimi Raikkonen

17.10.1979

Finland

Grands prix: 156 starts

Wins: 18

World Championships: 1 (2007)

It would be fair to say that few know what goes on in Raikkonen’s head, least of all Raikkonen. But the unsmiling mask hides an intelligent and daring driver of astonishing talent and his championship victory was just reward for his doggedness. But his sudden loss of form since is a mystery. Perhaps Raikkonen is bored with Formula One but we hope he makes a substantial comeback.



12. Graham Hill

17.2.1929 to 29.11.1975

Great Britain

Grands prix: 176

Wins: 14

World Championships: 2 (1962, 68)


No one who lived through the 1960s could escape Hill, with his clipped English accent and fighter pilot’s moustache. But the outwardly jokey Hill, Damon’s father, was ruthless in the business of Formula One, underlined by five victories in Monaco.
Suffered serious leg injuries at the age of 40 at the 1969 United States GP, which effectively finished his career although he drove on until 1974. Killed when the light plane he was piloting crashed on a golf course at Arkley, just north of London.

Hill on top ten years after passing test



11. Alberto Ascari

13.7.1918 to 26.5.1955

Italy

Grands prix: 32

Wins: 13

World Championships: 2 (1952, 53)


The very name conjures the great era of Italian dominance of Formula One. Ascari forged a partnership with Enzo Ferrari, which they exploited in exhilarating style as he won two world titles. Ascari was the darling of Italy, the son of Antonio, a famous pre-Second World War racer, and rated by some as better than the great Juan Manuel Fangio. But Ascari’s career ended bizarrely: at the 1955 Monaco Grand Prix, he crashed at the waterfront chicane and careered into the harbour; a week later, he was killed testing a Ferrari at Monza. He died on the same day of the same month as his father.



10. Mika Hakkinen

28.9.1968

Finland

Grands prix: 161

Wins: 20

World Championships: 2 (1998, 99)


If Hakkinen’s first victories were controversial, there was no doubting what came later. David Coulthard, his team-mate, was twice instructed to move over to allow the Finn to win his opening grand prix. But the Finn was faster and the only man who could go wheel-to-wheel with Michael Schumacher and gain the German’s respect. Hakkinen had announced himself by outqualifying Ayrton Senna, his team leader, at the 1993 Portuguese Grand Prix. Two years later, he narrowly escaped death in a massive shunt at the Australian Grand Prix in Adelaide. It was touch-and-go but he recovered to the delight of Ron Dennis and his McLaren team. A bond was forged between Dennis and Hakkinen, who served out his career with McLaren, showing flashes of raw genius, such as his daring manoeuvre on Schumacher at the 2000 Belgian Grand Prix, hailed as the overtaking move of the decade as the German went one way around the BAR Honda of Ricardo Zonta and Hakkinen went the other. Pure genius.



9. Nigel Mansell

8.8.1953

Great Britain

Grands prix: 187

Wins: 31

World Championships: 1 (1992)


There will simply never be another Nigel Mansell. Formula One is utterly divided on the Mansell question, with half adoring his bull-headed bravery, his antics and sometimes laughable moaning, and the other half detesting those same qualities. Here was a man willing to give up everything to drive a Formula One car and who would give everything in the cockpit. After a successful spell at Williams, Mansell went to Ferrari, at a time when the Scuderia were at a low ebb. He promptly won his first race for them and was hailed by the tifosi as Il Leone, the Lion. In Britain, "Our Nige" was nothing less than a hero, adored on a scale probably never witnessed before or since in Formula One. Strange, then, that he took his only title in a Williams car so utterly dominant, he barely had to break sweat. Inevitably, his break-up with Williams was messy and Mansell left for the United States to chalk up the IndyCar title to become the only driver to win motor racing’s two leading open-wheel championships back-to-back.



8. Fernando Alonso

29.7.1981

Spain

Grands prix:123

Wins: 21

World Championships: 2 (2005, 06)


Too many will remember Alonso’s sullen year at McLaren, definitely the low point of his career. But he would be better remembered as the precocious talent who knocked Michael Schumacher off his perch and proved himself to be a tough and intelligent competitor, who could drive brilliantly or simply play the percentages. The year at McLaren was an aberration, although Alonso still tied with Lewis Hamilton on points at the end of the 2007 season and took four victories. But on his return to the Renault team last year - and mercifully free of the Hamilton bandwagon - the Spaniard was back to his former self, driving an uncompetitive car with dexterity and determination. Alonso is one of the greats but has plenty of time to achieve even more.




7. Sir Stirling Moss

17.9.1929

Great Britain

Grands prix: 66

Wins: 16

World Championships: none


Where do you place the only driver in our top ten who did not win a world championship? Yet Moss is the driver they all look up to, a natural talent whose honesty and deference to the great Juan Manuel Fangio cost him at least one title and whose career was cut tragically short when he crashed at Goodwood on Easter Monday 1962. By then, as he emerged slowly from a coma, he was a national treasure with every policeman expected to ask a speeding motorist: “Who do you think you are, then? Stirling Moss?” It was a sign of the affection in which Moss was held by the British public. His greatest achievement possibly came outside Formula One when he drove a Mercedes-Benz 300SLR 1,000 miles across Italian roads to win the Mille Miglia at an incredible average speed of 99.2mph, a feat that will probably never be repeated. In Formula One, he was the nearly man, though, missing out on the 1958 championship by one point to Mike Hawthorn; in seven seasons from 1955, his championship placings were four seconds and three thirds - fantastic consistency without quite reaching the summit. In at least one survey of the greats of Formula One, Moss has been placed at No 1. He does not make it this time, but no list would be complete without him.



6. Juan Manuel Fangio

24.6.1911 to 17.7.1995

Argentina

Grands prix: 51

Wins: 24

World Championships: 5 (1951, 54, 55, 56, 57)

Consider this: Fangio drove in only 51 grands prix yet started 48 of them from the front row of the grid, winning almost half the races he competed in. An unlikely sporting figure, somewhat rotund with powerful forearms, Fangio became a legend in his own lifetime. He was clever enough to know where the best cars were, how to get a drive in them and then how to exploit them to their utmost. Even more astonishing was that Fangio was winning World Championships at an age when most men were putting on their slippers and sucking on a pipe in front of the fire; he was 47 when he won his final grand prix. Stirling Moss was in awe of his team-mate and even now insists that there has never been anyone better. We cannot argue, which is why, six decades on, Fangio must be included in our top ten.

Fangio's finest race


5. Sir Jackie Stewart


11.6.1939

Great Britain

Grands prix: 99

Wins: 27

World Championships: 3 (1969, 71, 73)


Jackie Stewart was the first millionaire racing driver and one of the most recognisable faces in sport at his peak. The lad from Dumbarton, in Scotland, dined out with royalty and shared his fun with multimillionaires, and his favourite haunts were in Monaco and in tax exile in Switzerland. But that all paled beside his focus on driving. He was a natural who found his niche with Ken Tyrrell’s homely team; the cars were not necessarily very good but in Stewart’s calm hands, they were winners. Stewart had no qualms about walking away from the sport, tantalisingly placed on 99 grands prix, after the death of François Cevert, his team-mate and close friend, and Stewart will probably want to be remembered as much for his refusal to accept lax safety standards and his campaigning for better measures that probably helped save the lives of many drivers. Now the elder statesman of F1, Stewart has emerged not only as a great driver but also as one of the greatest figures in motor racing.

Stewart's fight for world title


4. Alain Prost

24.2.1955

France

Grands prix: 199

Wins: 51

World Championships: 4 (1985, 86, 89, 93)

Prost finds it difficult to win admirers in the company of other mercurial, often fiery, drivers in Formula One who win flamboyantly and display their passion. But Prost was not nicknamed “The Professor” for nothing. He thought his way to victory, preparing meticulously and driving in exactly the same way, refusing to take risks and get involved in shenanigans with other drivers. It was not spectacular but as one seasoned commentator observed: “The faster he went, the slower he looked.” Prost’s nemesis, though, was Ayrton Senna and their fraught relationship at McLaren, understandable as they fought to be the team’s top dog, spilt over into rare bout of tit-for-tat for the Frenchman. In the end, he decamped for two unhappy years at Ferrari before he was fired before the end of the 1991 season. A year off led to a single season with Williams, partnering Damon Hill, and a final title. Quite a send-off for the Prof.

The world's toast is Prost



3. Michael Schumacher

3.1.1969

Germany

Grands prix: 250

Wins: 91

World Championships: 7 (1994, 95, 2000, 01, 02, 03, 04)


If statistics were the yardstick by which we measured the greatest of all time, this would be a walkover for Schumacher. He was the greatest record-breaker in the history of sport. You name it, he achieved it. He was also the consummate team-builder, creating a squad at Ferrari that was completely dedicated to him. He rewarded them with a level of commitment in the cockpit that was not only awe-inspiring but dominant for more than a decade. Yet, his incredible focus was both his strength and his downfall. He won his first title in 1994 amid dubious circumstances after crashing into Damon Hill, preventing the Briton from winning the championship. In 1997, he was expunged from the official records after doing the same to Jacques Villeneuve and who can forget, even near the end of his career, how he parked his Ferrari across the track at Monaco to prevent Fernando Alonso taking pole. Utterly ruthless, some may say a downright cheat. It is a shadow that will fall long across a truly great career from a truly extraordinary sportsman.



2. Ayrton Senna

21.3.1960 to 1.5.1994

Brazil

Grands prix: 161

Wins: 41

World Championships: 3 (1988, 90, 91)


Ayrton Senna has been elevated to the status of a legend as much because of the dramatic circumstances of his death in front of a worldwide television audience. The world held its breath on that day in May 1994, as doctors tried to extricate the three-times champion from the wreckage of his Williams. The Brazilian had started the San Marino Grand Prix desperately trying to fend off the challenge of Michael Schumacher, the pretender to his throne, when his car careered off the Imola circuit into a wall. Senna could be regarded as the forerunner to the modern grand-prix driver, as dedicated to his fitness as he was to his technical ability and understanding of the the modern grand-prix car. When he was hired by McLaren to partner Alain Prost, he was not remotely overawed to be alongside an established champion. He just worked harder until Prost had to move on. Ruthless, private and yet a practical joker, particularly in the company of Gerhard Berger and Ron Dennis, his McLaren team principal, Senna was the complete driver: brave, fast, skilful, exciting and daring. We will never know whether Senna would have overcome Schumacher in what could have been one of the most fascinating battles in the history of Formula One.



1. Jim Clark

4.3.1936 to 7.4.1968

Great Britain

Grands prix: 72

Wins: 25

World Championships: 2 (1963, 65)


There was always the feeling that Jim Clark could drive a milk float and make it fly around a grand-prix track. Adept in saloon cars and sports cars, he was the yardstick by which every driver wanted to measure themselves in Formula One. There was nothing he could not do at the wheel of a Formula One car and his marriage with Lotus was made in grand-prix heaven. The shy son of a Scottish border farmer had little to say for himself and would have been out of place in today‘s publicity-hungry environment, ruled by sponsors flinging around money and demanding the attention of the drivers they backed. Clark was a gentleman amateur who drove simply because he loved driving. And he was sublime at the wheel, his touch and feel for his car and the circuit without peer. He could administer a trouncing that would leave his rivals in admiration, no more so than at the extraordinary Spa-Francorchamps circuit in Belgium. In the 1960s, the circuit was more than eight miles long, winding through the dense forests of the Ardennes, with its quixotic micro-climate, which struck on race day for the Belgian Grand Prix in 1963. Clark drove through the pouring rain to lap the entire field, which effectively put him eight miles in front of his nearest challenger. Clark was also impressively accident-free, registering only three crashes in eight Formula One seasons, which only underlines the paradox of his death. In a minor Formula Two race at Hockenheim, his car flew off the track into the trees and he was killed instantly. Formula One stood still and his death even now ripples through the sport. The quiet man from Scotland was gone, but the memories of his immense talent live on.
tocino.jpg

Lista de ignorados: LUCA BADOER, calvonso

Comentarios

  • el paletael paleta MegaForero
    no, si hubiera sido marca estaría el primeroimage
    scuderia.jpg Nos gustan los coches rápidos, emocionantes y dinámicos y los estamos sacrificando para salvar a unos cuantos escarabajos y ranas que son aburridos, feos, inútiles y repugnantes. Si existe algo cómo Dios, apuesto a que está sentado en una nube ahora mismo, preguntándose si tal vez su mejor especie se ha vuelto completamente loca. JC dixit
  • ¿Piquet por delante de Button?

    Ah, que es el padre... :D
  • AteoAteo MegaForero ✭✭✭✭✭
    Mauro escribió : »
    ¿Piquet por delante de Button?

    Ah, que es el padre... :D

    y por delante de Hamilton tambien...image

    Salu2image
    dzayp0.jpg
  • belmarbelmar MegaForero ✭✭✭✭
    ¿Alonso mejor que Lauda?
    Bueno, estas clasificaciones es lo que tienen...como esas de las 100 mejores canciones del rock y tal...mil tios, mil resultados diferentes jejeje.
    x31c418w1azw.png






















  • AitnaxAitnax Forero Senior ✭✭✭
    Dato curioso que los 7 que tiene delante ya no compiten, al igual que los 4 siguientes a él, con lo cual es más fácil adelantar posiciones en ese sentido y con menos posibilidades de perderlas.

    Saludos.
    Homo homini lupus est



    Citroen_Xantia_Activa_Logo.jpg
  • el paletael paleta MegaForero
    qué **** hace button ahíimage
    scuderia.jpg Nos gustan los coches rápidos, emocionantes y dinámicos y los estamos sacrificando para salvar a unos cuantos escarabajos y ranas que son aburridos, feos, inútiles y repugnantes. Si existe algo cómo Dios, apuesto a que está sentado en una nube ahora mismo, preguntándose si tal vez su mejor especie se ha vuelto completamente loca. JC dixit
  • noitaminoitami Forero Master ✭✭✭✭
    el **** escribió : »
    no, si hubiera sido marca estaría el primeroimage

    imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage
    tocino.jpg

    Lista de ignorados: LUCA BADOER, calvonso
  • cmr1650cmr1650 MegaForero ✭✭✭✭✭
    el **** escribió : »
    no, si hubiera sido marca estaría el primeroimage


    Bueno, tampoco son los ingleses un ejemplo de imparcialidad image


    ¿que **** hace Jim Clark el 1º? image image image


    Y que conste que a mi se me haría imposible elegir a uno entre los 6 primeros (ó entre los 8 image image)
    When i was growin' up there were two things unpopular in my house, one was me ...
    another was my guitar"


    Oh Lord, won´t you buy me a Mercedes Benz ?
    My friends all drive Porsches, I must make amends,
    Worked hard all my lifetime, no help from my friends,
    So Lord, won´t you buy me a Mercedes Benz ?




  • alexmore21alexmore21 MegaForero ✭✭✭✭✭
    el **** escribió : »
    qué **** hace button ahíimage

    Cosas de los británicos image, a mí no me dicen nada estas clasificaciones, estoy seguro de que el que hizo esta clasificación no ha visto a todos esos pilotos competir.

    Yo lo que he visto ha sido desde Senna hacia adelante, y para mí sería claramente el 1º de la lista, el que tengan mas o menos títulos mundiales es importante pero no determinante y más estos últimos años con tanto cambio en el reglamento donde equipos pasan de la nada a ganar mundiales o viceversa
    cmr1650 escribió :
    Al final todo se resume en que no sé quien es más ****, el que no se da cuenta que en el precio del BMW hay un importe que se llama marca, ó el que se compra un Renault y piensa que se lleva un Mercedes (ó un BMWimage )
    Xema escribió : »
    Las generalizaciones no son generalmente buenas, aparte que generalmente el que generaliza es ****
    imageimageimageimage
  • cmr1650cmr1650 MegaForero ✭✭✭✭✭
    alexmore21 escribió : »
    Cosas de los británicos image, a mí no me dicen nada estas clasificaciones, estoy seguro de que el que hizo esta clasificación no ha visto a todos esos pilotos competir.

    Yo lo que he visto ha sido desde Senna hacia adelante, y para mí sería claramente el 1º de la lista, el que tengan mas o menos títulos mundiales es importante pero no determinante y más estos últimos años con tanto cambio en el reglamento donde equipos pasan de la nada a ganar mundiales o viceversa

    Es evidentemente el más espectacular, pero creo redordar que estas palabras eran suyas (de cuando todavía no se tiraban de los pelos image)

    "para ganar una carrera de F1 has de hacerlo todo perfecto y en todas las vueltas, porqué si te equivocas en una sóla curva vá a estar detrás el jodido francés (Prost) y te va a levantar la carrera"



    Bueno realmente, no recuerdo si fue Senna ó Lauda quien lo dijo image, pero fué seguro uno de los dos image



    Lo que me he quedado con ganas, es precisamente de haber visto, en su día, a los británicos de esa lista (a los buenos ehh image)
    When i was growin' up there were two things unpopular in my house, one was me ...
    another was my guitar"


    Oh Lord, won´t you buy me a Mercedes Benz ?
    My friends all drive Porsches, I must make amends,
    Worked hard all my lifetime, no help from my friends,
    So Lord, won´t you buy me a Mercedes Benz ?




  • XemaXema Forero Master ✭✭✭
    Inmerecido el puesto de Button. Nunca ha mostrado un rendimiento por encima del de su coche, como si lo ha hecho Lewis Hamilton.

    El año 2004, con BAR, hasta Takuma Sato hizo podios. Y de este año mejor no hablamos. Cuando le vinieron mal dadas se arrugó como una pasa.

    De lo de Alonso, lleva en el 8º desde 2006. Aún no ha conseguido subir de ese puesto, por razones de sobra conocidas.
    ¿¿¿ QUÉ ME ESTÁS CONTANDO ???

    20ud79f.gif


    Miembro nº 1 del "Club Furgalla-SUV"

    ¡¡¡EN WILKINS HYUNDAY Y SUBARÚ, TENEMOS HYUNDAIS Y SUBARÚS!!!
  • chiripachiripa Forero ✭✭
    que **** hace niki lauda ahi??imageimage
    la f1 se lleva por dentro igual que la sangre, es un sentimiento indefinible.........................

    CHIRIPA




    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • alexmore21alexmore21 MegaForero ✭✭✭✭✭
    cmr1650 escribió : »
    Es evidentemente el más espectacular, pero creo redordar que estas palabras eran suyas (de cuando todavía no se tiraban de los pelos image)

    "para ganar una carrera de F1 has de hacerlo todo perfecto y en todas las vueltas, porqué si te equivocas en una sóla curva vá a estar detrás el jodido francés (Prost) y te va a levantar la carrera"



    Bueno realmente, no recuerdo si fue Senna ó Lauda quien lo dijo image, pero fué seguro uno de los dos image



    Lo que me he quedado con ganas, es precisamente de haber visto, en su día, a los británicos de esa lista (a los buenos ehh image)
    Ah no, desde luego, si hiciese una lista del piloto mas calculador y a la vez con un talento increible ese sería Prost sin ninguna duda, ese si que sabía aprovechar cualquier fallo del resto y encima era rapidísimo, pero veía a Senna y como yo era un crio pues me encantaba el "pirao" image
    cmr1650 escribió :
    Al final todo se resume en que no sé quien es más ****, el que no se da cuenta que en el precio del BMW hay un importe que se llama marca, ó el que se compra un Renault y piensa que se lleva un Mercedes (ó un BMWimage )
    Xema escribió : »
    Las generalizaciones no son generalmente buenas, aparte que generalmente el que generaliza es ****
    imageimageimageimage
  • FerrariasturFerrariastur MegaForero ✭✭✭
    cmr1650 escribió : »
    Bueno, tampoco son los ingleses un ejemplo de imparcialidad image


    ¿que **** hace Jim Clark el 1º? image image image


    Y que conste que a mi se me haría imposible elegir a uno entre los 6 primeros (ó entre los 8 image image)


    Jim Clark, el primero te lo explico ¿sera por esto?
    ¿se acuerdan lo que aceleraba Ayrton los sábados? Bueno, mientras el brasileño se impuso en el 40.37% de las clasificaciones que disputó, Clark ganó un 5.46% mas. Todos también conocen la capacidad de Michael Schumacher para ganar carreras... Bueno, mientras el alemán ha vencido el 33.13% de las carreras que ha disputado, Clark ganó un 1.59% más.


    Solamente habra sido por que es el mejor de la historia en porcentaje de victorias sobre carreras disputadas y lo mismo sobre las poles
    ford_logos.jpg
    cos_logo.jpg

    "Quiero seguir en Ferrari y ganar el tercer título con ellos, acabar el trabajo de años" 02/09/2014
    "Vengo a Mclaren para acabar el trabajo que empecé en 2007" 11/12/2014

    "Nunca volveré a McLaren". 01/12/2010
    "Dejar Mclaren fue la mejor decisión que he tomado en mi vida". 12/09/2012

    "No pararé hasta ser campeón con Ferrari". 07/09/2011
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